Dresden Nexus Conference

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Dresden Nexus Conference
 
Dresden Nexus Conferences
Advancing a nexus approach to the sustainable management of water, soil and waste

Dresden Nexus Conference 2015 (DNC2015)

The First of the DNCs in Dresden, Germany on 25-27 March 2015

Download the DNC flyer here.

Global Change, SDGs, Nexus Approach

The first of the biennial Dresden Nexus conferences (DNC2015) will take place in Dresden, Germany, 25-27 March 2015, as a follow up of our kick-off workshop on “Advancing a Nexus Approach to the Sustainable Management of Water, Soil and Waste“ organized in 2013.

The Nexus Approach to the sustainable management of water, soil and waste integrates environmental management and governance across sectors and scales. This approach is based on the understanding that environmental resources are inextricably intertwined.  Global change will put additional pressure on environmental resources and related ecosystem services as well as on the economic development. The DNC 2015 will deal with these challenges. There will be three thematic topics on three consecutive days; each day will deal with one aspect of global change: climate, urbanization and demography. It will be discussed how the integrated management of environmental resources guided by nexus approach may help to achieve the potential targets of the post-2015 agenda.

The DNC2015 will assemble policy-makers and managers of environmental resources, academic, educational and research institutions, national and international organizations, including UN organizations and UNU institutes, NGOs and others who work on and are interested in environmental resources management.

Please  go to our webpages for more information: Announcement, Important dates, Background and aims, Expected outcomes, Key themes, Registration, Organizers and supporters, Venue and Acoomodation.

Announcements

Call for Session Proposals

We are now accepting Session Proposals. The deadline is 31 May 2014.  Please see the section Calls for Submissions for more information.

 

Important Dates

31 May 2014 Deadline for submitting Session Proposals
15 July – 30 Sept 2014 Call for Abstracts
15 December 2014 Deadline for early bird registration
15 February 2015 Deadline for regular registration
25 – 27 March 2015 Conference

Background and aims

As a follow up of our kick-off workshop on “Advancing a Nexus Approach to the Sustainable Management of Water, Soil and Waste” http://flores.unu.edu/nexus-kickoff-workshop/ , the first of the biyearly Dresden Nexus conferences (DNC) takes place from March, 25 to 27, 2015. The 2015 DNC will assemble UN organizations, UNU institutes, member states, German ministries, national and international organizations as well as individual researchers and NGOs from around the world under the theme “Global Change, Sustainable Development Goals and the Nexus Approach”.

The nexus approach to the sustainable management of water, soil and waste integrates environmental management and governance across sectors and scales. This approach is based on the understanding that environmental resources are inextricably intertwined. Considering their mutual dependencies in environmental management may therefore increase overall resource efficiency, and ensure equitable benefit sharing. In addition, reducing the use of resources, recycling of resources and reuse of resources is at the core of the nexus approach. Taking a nexus approach for environmental resources may help to decrease environmental risks and ecological scarcities under conditions of global change as well as to ensure an economic development.

Humans’ impact on the planet is altering the flow of energy, matter and water. These man-made perturbations impair ecosystems and diminish their capacity to deliver ecological goods and services. As a result of environmental degradation, food and water insecurity are already increasing in many parts of the world. These insecurities will be further aggravated by global demographic (e.g. population growth) and climate changes and increasing urbanisation. Population growth and urbanization increases the demand for crops, forest products, water, energy and minerals. As a consequence of such developments, land cover are changing worldwide: Primary forests, grassland, wetlands and deserts are being converted to arable land, plantations, and human settlements and infrastructure. Land cover changes are often associated with degradation of soil and water resources, loss of biodiversity, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and pollution. The increased demand for natural resources is thus one of the major driver for global environmental change.

The impact of global change on the environment as well as the services provided by ecosystems and how to cope with these impacts needs to be considered in the ongoing debate on sustainable development goals beyond 2015. Facing global change, the development of a post-2015 agenda not only has to include goals and targets but also measures and approaches which pave the way for reducing poverty in a truly sustainable manner.

The 2015 Dresden Nexus Conference will focus on the contributions of a nexus approach to the management of water, soil and waste, and will specifically address the following questions:

  1. How can environmental resources such as water and soil be maintained and enhanced under the conditions of global change?
  2. How can a more efficient and sustainable use of the resources water, soil and waste be facilitated given the limited resources availability and environmental decline?
  3. How can international development partners be engaged for the promotion of research, capacity development and implementation of a nexus approach which would be instrumental to achieving the SDGs?
  4. How can a transition towards a green economy be facilitated, especially with regard to agriculture, considering the intricate linkage of soil, water and waste management?

Expected Outcomes

  • Consensus on good management practices for maintaining and enhancing environmental resources while fostering a more equitable economic situation to all.
  • Documentation of the state of the art of adopting a nexus approach to the management of water, soil and waste.
  • Documentation of knowledge gaps on trade-offs and synergies covering bio-physical and governance dimensions with potential to advance the nexus approach to management of water, soil and waste resources (mainly related to question 2 and 3);
  • Identification of priorities for research, education and policy advice related to the above listed questions.
  • Identification of individual and institutional capacity requirements for the implementation of the nexus approach at various spatial scales.
  • Definition of indicators and required data and information describing the benefits of a nexus approach and their relevance for addressing.
  • Exploration of synergy potentials of a nexus approach to managing water, soil and waste by evaluating case studies and best practice examples in terms of research and implementation.
  • Identification of needs for creating incentives and removing barriers to unlock the potential of a green economy.
  • Identification of appropriate strategies for implementation of a nexus approach considering various temporal and spatial scales.

The nexus approach to the sustainable management of water, soil and waste integrates environmental management and governance across sectors and scales. This approach is based on the understanding that environmental resources are inextricably intertwined. Global change will put additional pressure on environmental resources and related ecosystem services as well as on the economic development. The DNC 2015 will deal with these challenges. There will be three thematic topics on three consecutive days; each day will deal with one aspect of global change: climate, urbanization and demography. It will be discussed how the integrated management of environmental resources guided by nexus approach may help to achieve the potential targets of the post-2015 agenda.

The Key themes

Key theme 1:  Climate

How adopting a nexus approach may mitigate the growing water, food and energy insecurity due to climate change from an environmental resources perspective. (See below for more information on Theme 1: Climate)

Key theme 2:  Urbanization

Exploring opportunities for multi-level governance arrangements that foster inclusive forms of urbanization based on an improved understanding of trade-offs and scope for synergies. (See below for more information on Theme 2: Urbanization)

Key theme 3: Demography

How the management of environmental resources guided by a nexus approach can support the sustainable and economically feasible intensification of biomass production. (See below for more information on Theme 3: Demography)

 Theme 1:  Climate

This session will show how adopting a nexus approach may mitigate the growing water, food and energy insecurity due to climate change  from an environmental resources perspective.

In many regions of the world, food and water security are at risk due to the overuse of water resources, soil degradation, erosion and contamination. Climate change will further exacerbate these risks, particularly in water-limited environments and in marginal regions via various mechanisms such as enhancing desertification, increasing frequency of floods and droughts, which will intensify soil erosion, loss of nutrients etc. Energy security, particularly if linked to biomass and/or hydropower will also be affected. The intricate inter-linkage of water and soil resources per se requires an integrated – thus a nexus approach for sustainable management of water, soil and waste. This necessity becomes even more important under conditions of climate change. In particular extreme events also pose serious challenges to waste management: wastewater treatment is impaired both by floods and droughts, solid waste and hazardous waste, not collected and stored properly will contaminate wide areas, clogg sewer systems etc. in case of flooding. Contributions to this thematic topic thus might include, but are not limited to adapted land-use and irrigation management (potentially including wastewater reuse), rain water harvesting, management of multi-purpose reservoirs, generation of energy by hydropower as well as aspects of urban planning (addressing water, soil and waste resources) and drought and flood risk management. Emphasis will be placed on case studies providing insight in the implementation of adaptation measures and the involvement of stakeholders and the public.

OVERARCHING QUESTIONS GUIDING ORGANIZATION OF THEME 1

1. How and by which management options may a nexus approach to the management of water, soil and waste contribute to mitigate adverse effects of climate change, e.g. land degradation and desertification due to drought on water, food and energy security?

2. How to adapt current management strategies considering the need to address increasing uncertainty, frequency, intensity and duration of extreme events and balancing trade-offs between sectors?

3. What lessons can be drawn based on international and multi-level governance arrangements that respond to the challenges posed by stronger inter-dependencies between water, soil and waste resources on account of climate change?

Theme 2: Urbanization: What kind of governance arrangements can foster sustainable use of environmental resources?

The objective of the session is to explore opportunities for multi-level governance arrangements that foster inclusive forms of urbanization based on an improved understanding of trade-offs and scope for synergies.

A majority of the world’s population presently lives in urban areas. Demand for water, energy and food from rural and peri-urban areas is on the rise. Rising income and changing employment patterns in cities and rural hinterland is likely to lead to increased investment in infrastructure such as roads, water transport, sanitation and urban drainage systems. Increased construction of infrastructure is likely to expand the area under built environment with consequences in the form of altered resource fluxes and flows. The resource poor in slums within a city are likely to be adversely affected by such trends due to their inability to access services such as water supply, urban drainage or sewage. Climate change is likely to exacerbate such trends because of increased frequency, intensity and duration of extreme weather events. Increased variability in temperature and rainfall patterns will be reflected in floods and droughts with consequences for public health especially among the poor in low-lying areas and slums. As economic activity increases in cities in developing and emerging economies trade-offs between the use of water, waste and soil resources, equity and sustainable management of environmental resources are also likely to increase. Further, the search for synergies is likely to intensify as governments at different levels (international, national and local) engage private and citizen groups to identify opportunities for resource optimization through efficient use of environmental and budgetary resources. How equipped is the scientific community to capture changes in human behavior (such as cropping practices), analyze their impact on bio-physical processes and build capacity of governments to predict and respond to environmental shocks and stresses (examples: decline in soil fertility and air quality, increased GHG emissions, deterioration in water quality or increased incidence of floods and droughts)?

OVERARCHING QUESTIONS GUIDING ORGANIZATION OF THEME 2

1. What knowledge and information gaps exist with regard to our understanding of trade-offs between the use of water, waste and soil resources in urban areas, equity and sustainable management of environmental resources?

2. What lessons can be drawn based on trans-boundary and multi-level governance arrangements that respond to the challenges posed by stronger inter-dependencies between water, soil and waste resources on account of urbanization?

3. What role can international cooperation play in fostering sustainable and inclusive forms of urbanization covering (but not limited to) issues such as SMART buildings, technology transfer, city sanitation planning, results based financing and methodologies for performance benchmarking?

Theme 3: Demography: How to cope with the increasing demand for biomass in a sustainable way?

This session will show that the management of environmental resources guided by a nexus approach can support the sustainable and economic feasible intensification of biomass production.

Demography is changing rapidly, but the degree of change generally differs between developed and developing countries. In more developed countries, societies are often shrinking and aging whereas in many developing countries the population is growing. Demographic changes are related to increased environmental resources uses, housing demand, labor force, food preference and lifestyle, adaptation to new technologies and systems. This session focuses on strategies to address challenges for sustainable resource management posed by population growth: In 2011, the world’s population reached 7 Billion. Roughly one of eight suffered from chronic hunger in the period from 2011 to 2013. Despite of all efforts, the number of undernourished people is constantly on the rise because of population growth, limited resources availability and environmental degradation. It is expected that 9.6 Billion people will be living on our planet by 2050. How to feed an increasing and more demanding world population – while reducing GHG emissions from agriculture – is therefore one of the greatest challenges in 21st century. The increasing demand for food and animal feed competes with the rising demands for biofuel. At the same time, increasing soil and land degradation as well as the accelerating pace of conversion of fertile arable land in peri-urban areas into residential and commercial areas induces significant stress on the remaining soils of good quality. Biomass production depends not only on soil but also on water resources. The agricultural sector, the largest fresh water consumer, accounts for 70% of global use. But pollution and over-use of water resources as well as changes in historical rainfall patterns are contributing to water scarcity and therefore, impair biomass production in many regions of the world. Despite some progress, farming mainly focuses on maximization of crop yield and income. It is yet well-understood that this narrow view depletes natural capital and produces significant quantities of global greenhouse gases and other pollutants, which disproportionately affect the poor (UNEP, 2011).

OVERARCHING QUESTIONS GUIDING ORGANIZATION OF THEME 3

1. What are the implications for agricultural systems and practices of adopting a Nexus approach?

2. What are the co-benefits of adopting a nexus approach to the management of soil and land for other resources such as water and waste? How does recycling of water and waste contribute to higher resources efficiency?

3. What are the economical, institutional, regional, and scientific barriers to implement farming practices guided by the integrated management of soil, water and waste?

Call for Session Proposals for the Dresden Nexus Conference

Deadline 31 May 2014

The organizing team of the first Dresden Nexus Conference is now accepting session proposals. Submissions are particularly encouraged from policy-makers and managers of environmental resources, national and international organizations, academic, educational and research institutions, NGOs and others who work on or are interested in environmental resources management. We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Scope of the conference
The conference will identify best management practices for maintaining and enhancing environmental resources, using a nexus approach as the point of departure. Knowledge gaps with regards to integrated management of environmental resources both in bio-physical and governance dimensions will be explored, allowing for the identification of priorities for research, education and policy advice. The conference will further identify capacity development needs (individual and institutional) required for the implementation of a nexus approach and instrumental to achieving the sustainable development goals (SDGs). By evaluating case studies and best practices, the removal of barriers to unlock the potential of a green economy will be identified.

  • Background and Aims
  • Expected Outcome
Key ThemesTopic 1: Climate – how adopting a nexus approach may mitigate the growing water, food and energy insecurity due to climate change from an environmental resources perspective.
Topic 2: Urbanization – exploring opportunities for multi-level governance arrangements that foster inclusive forms of urbanization based on an improved understanding of trade-offs and scope for synergies.
Topic 3: Demography – how the management of environmental resources guided by a nexus approach can support the sustainable and economically feasible intensification of biomass production.
Scientific Committee31 May 2014         Deadline for submitting Session Proposals
18 June 2014                                         Notification of Acceptance
15 July to 30 Sept 2014                        Call for Abstracts of papers
31 October 2014                                    Notification of Acceptance
15 December  2014                               Deadline for early bird registration  |  Conference programme will be posted
15 February                                          Deadline for regular registration
25 – 27 March 2015                              Conference

Session Proposals: Guidelines and Information

We welcome proposals from institutions who would like to organize a session at the Dresden Nexus Conference 2015 (DNC 2015). The sessions will (tentatively) have a time slot of 90 minutes. The convener develops the content and format of the session around a selected issue. The selected issue has to be related to the thematic scope of the DNC 2015. In particularly, we are interested in session proposals which expand on the thematic topics raised in the concept note of the DNC 2015:

  • Demography: How to cope with the increasing demand for biomass in a sustainable way?
  • Urbanization: What kind of governance arrangements can foster sustainable use of environmental resources?
  • Climate: How to cope with the impact of increasing frequency of extreme events on water, soil and waste resources?

The convener duties include:

  • Definition of sessions by title, description, and organizers
  • Definition of the format of the proposed session
  • Organizing and chairing the session
  • Advertisement of the session to scientific community of the conveners
  • Selection the abstracts for oral and poster presentations
  • Preparing a short report of the session to be presented to the plenary

The proposal should be prepared in the following format and covering the following points:

  • Convener(s)
  • Session Title
  • Short description of the session (<200 words)
  • Objectives and expected outcomes of the session (<150 words)
  • Anticipated format (plenary talks/panel discussion/roundtable discussion)
  • Target group

We are using the EasyChair tool for managing the conference. For submitting the proposal, you first have to register for the DNC 2015. Please go to

https://www.easychair.org/account/signup.cgi

and follow the instructions to create an account in EasyChair. After filling in initial information you will receive an email with a separate link to complete the registration.

Once you created your EasyChair account, please go to

https://www.easychair.org/conferences/?conf=nexus2015

On the top-right of the page, click on “New Submission” to enter the required information for submitting a session proposal.

Please enter the fields as follows:

  • Convener(s): in “Authors”
  • Session Title
  • Short description of the session (<200 words): please add as first paragraph in “Abstract”
  • Objectives and expected outcomes of the session (<150 words): please add as second paragraph in “Abstract”
  • Anticipated format (plenary talks/panel discussion/roundtable discussion): please add as first line in “Keywords”
  • Target group: please add as second and subsequent lines under “Keywords”

stakeholders

Registration

To register please visit this link:

https://www.easychair.org/account/signup.cgi

Steering Committee


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Dr. Graham Alabaster is a public health engineer, originally for the UK, who has worked for UNHABITAT since 1992. Prior to that he was an international consultant. He was responsible for the development of some of UNHABITAT’s flagship programs on water, sanitation and solid waste management and provides advice to governments.  His areas of specialty are sanitation, wastewater management and solid waste recycling and disposal. He is currently on loan to World Health Organization where he is developing joint initiatives on urban health and environment. He holds a first degree in chemical engineering and a doctorate in Civil Engineering.

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Prof. Dr. Reza Ardakanian of Iran, Co-chair of the Steering Committee, was appointed as the Founding Director of UNU-FLORES. He has served as Director of the UN-Water Decade Programme on Capacity Development hosted by UNU since 2007 and as Vice-Rector of UNU in Europe, ad interim (2009–2011). He sat on the Boards of various international programs/organizations such as UNESCO-IHP, UNESCO-IHE, the International Hydropower Association and UNU-EHS. Prof. Dr. Ardakanian holds a PhD in Water Resources Management from McMaster University (Canada) and is a faculty member of Sharif University of Technology in Tehran, Iran. He formerly held a number of national offices in Iran, including Deputy Minister for Water Affairs (2001–2005), Senior Vice-Minister (1998–2001) and Deputy Minister for Planning & Economic Affairs (1989–1991) with the Ministry of Energy, and Deputy Minister for Urban Development and Municipalities with the Ministry of Interior (1987–1989).

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Elias T. Ayuk is the Director of the United Nations University Institute for Natural Resources in Africa (UNU-INRA) based in Accra, Ghana.  He holds an undergraduate degree with honours in Economics (1984) from Hamline University of Minnesota in St. Paul, Minnesota, USA. He obtained an MSc (1986) and PhD (1989) degrees in Agricultural Economics from Texas A&M University in College Station, Texas, USA. On completion of his PhD in 1989, he served for two years (1990 -1991) at the International Fertilizer Development Centre (IFDC)-Africa office based in Lomé, Togo as a Visiting Scientist under the Rockefeller Foundation Social Science Fellowship program. In 1992, he joined the International Centre for Research in Agroforestry (ICRAF), now known as the World Agroforestry Centre, and was posted successively to Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso (1992-1994), Bamako, Mali (1994-1998) and Harare, Zimbabwe (1998-2002). He joined the Canadian International Development Research Centre (IDRC) at its West and Central Africa Regional Office in Dakar, Senegal in 2002. He served as Senior Programme Specialist and later Executive Director of IDRC’s Secretariat for Institutional Support for Economic Research in Africa (SISERA) from 2002 to 2006. From 2006 to 2010, he was a Senior Programme Specialist for IDRC’s Globalization, Growth and Poverty Program Initiative. His research interests focus on poverty analysis, institutional capacity building and the social, economic and policy dimensions of natural resource management.

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Joachim von Braun is Director of the Center for Development Research (ZEF), Bonn University, and Professor for economic and technological change.  von Braun’s main research interests are in economic development, poverty reduction, food and nutrition security, resource economics, trade, science and technology policy. He is chair of the Bioeconomy Council of the Federal German Government; member of German Academies, Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Sciences, and member of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences of the Vatican; His awards include the Justus von Liebig Prize for World Nutrition 2011, the Bertebos Prize by the Royal Swedish Academy of Agriculture and Forestry 2009.

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Blanca Jiménez, Co-chair of the Steering Committee, is an environmental engineer with Masters and PhD degrees in wastewater treatment and reuse obtained in France. She has authored more than 414 papers, published and presented in international scientific journals, books and conferences. She received the Mexican National Prize for Science and Technology (2009); was president of the Environmental Engineers’ Association (1999-2000), and of the Mexican Federation of Sanitary Engineers and Environmental Science Association (2001-2002). She was a member of the board of directors of the International Water Association (2004-2008) and chair of the IWA Water Reuse Specialist Group (2006-2009), as also holds membership of the Nominating Committee for the Stockholm Water Prize (2007-2012). Currently, she is the Director of the Division of Water Sciences, Secretary of the International Hydrological Programme at UNESCO. She sits on the editorial committees of several international journals such as Water Science and Technology; Water Reuse and Desalination; and Residuals Science and Technology. She is co-coordinator of leading authors for the freshwater resources chapter under the adaptation group of the IPCC. In 2010 she received the Global Water Award from the International Water Association.

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Prof. Dr. Karl-Heinz Feger, Co-chair of the Steering Committee, serves as Dean of the Faculty of Environmental Sciences of the TU Dresden. He is director of the Institute of Soil Science and Site Ecology. He studied hydrology in Freiburg/Br. (Germany) and Zurich (ETH, Switzerland). After his PhD and habilitation in forest soils and hydrology/biogeochemistry in Freiburg he worked at Hohenheim University (Faculty of Agricultural Sciences) before in 2000 he became full professor at TUD. Research topics are soil-water-plant relations at various spatial scales. Karl-Heinz Feger is Editor-in-Chief of “Journal of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science” (German Soil Science Society DBG, Wiley-Blackwell) since 2003.

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Ariane Greubel works as desk officer in the Unit Universities and Art Colleges in the Department of Higher Education. After taking on different posts in the State Chancellery and the State Ministry of Interior, she moved to the SMWK in February 2010. The State Ministry is responsible for promoting research and training in Saxon universities, art colleges, universities of applied sciences and vocational academies.  The ministry also takes care of the Arts in Saxony (museums, theatres, orchestras and libraries) and promotes research institutes outside the universities, such as Max-Planck, Helmholtz, Leibnitz or Fraunhofer institutes. Additionally, the State Ministry is responsible for technology policy and the promotion of technology.

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Franz Makeschin: Scientific Director of the Competence Center for Environmental Management and Energy at Dresden International University DIU; Prof. em. for Soil Science and Soil Protection at Dresden University of Technology; Chairman of the Soil Protection Commission KBU of the Federal Environmental Agency of Germany UBA; Member of the EU-Committee Life, Environment and Geo Sciences LEGS at Science Europe; Member of acatech – German National Academy of Science and Engineering.

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Bernhard Müller is the Director of the Leibniz Institute of Ecological Urban and Regional Development (IOER) in Dresden (Germany), and holds the Chair of Spatial Development at the Technische Universität Dresden. He is also currently the Director of the Dresden Leibniz Graduate School. Bernhard Müller’s research interests and expertise are in sustainable urban and regional development, and spatial planning as well as in issues of resilience and regional adaptation strategies.

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Fabrice Renaud is Head of the Environmental Vulnerability and Ecosystem Services section (EVES) at the United Nations University Institute for Environment and Human Security (UNU-EHS). He is currently based in Jakarta, Indonesia where, among other things, he is developing the institutional links between UNU-EHS and the Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI). His main research foci are on the role of ecosystems in disaster risk reduction and on water pollution. Fabrice Renaud holds a PhD in Agronomy.

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Stefan Uhlenbrook joint UNESCO-IHE in 2005 as professor for hydrology; he has been with the university of Freiburg Germany before (1996-2004) as assistant and associate professor. Since January 2013, professor Uhlenbrook is the vice-rector of UNESCO-IHE (UNESC) staff member). His main interests are the impacts of global changes on water as well as issues related to capacity building, with particular emphasis on developing countries and countries in transition.

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Olcay Ünver is the Deputy-Director of the Land and Water Division of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) since September 2013. His responsibilities at FAO include the water, land and soil related activities and programs, mainstreaming water across the various sectors and disciplines, and cooperating with partners and stakeholders within and outside the United Nations system. Between 2007 and 2013 he served as the Coordinator of the United Nations World Water Assessment Programme and the Director of the UNESCO Programme Office on Global Water Assessment. Prior to that, he was a distinguished professor of water resources at Kent State University, Ohio, where he founded the Euphrates-Tigris Initiative for Cooperation (ETIC). He served for 13 years as the president of the Southeastern Anatolia Project (GAP) Regional Development Administration in Turkey and transformed a large infrastructure project into a sustainable socioeconomic development program. Mr. Ünver holds a Ph.D. in Civil Engineering from The University of Texas at Austin and Master’s and Bachelor’s degrees, also in Civil Engineering, from Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey.

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Timothy O. Williams is Director for Africa at the International Water Management Institute (IWMI). He holds a doctorate degree in Agricultural Economics from Oxford University, United Kingdom. His research interests cover microeconomic analysis of land, soil nutrient and water management practices of smallholder farmers as well as analysis of the impact of policies and institutions on natural resource management. He is currently conducting research to examine the water, food security and livelihoods impacts of large-scale land acquisitions in Africa. He is a Fellow of the Association of African Agricultural Economists and author of more than 60 scientific papers, book chapters and conference contributions.

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Dr. Sergio Zelaya-Bonilla is an economist who has been working with sustainable development issues for decades, gaining vast experience on environmental policy and advocacy both from the perspective of a protagonist of the political process while working for his national government, acting as as viceminister of the Environment in Honduras, as well as from the perspective of the UN system, first as a negotiator of several conventions and later joining the UNCCD Secretariat, where he first headed the unit in charge of the Latin America and Caribbean region, then the Policy advocacy unit and since 2014 as Special Adviser on Global Issues. In his work, Mr. Zelaya focuses on the economic, social and environmental policy angles and technical aspects of ecosystem resilience, and policy options related with land / land degradation, desertification and drought.

Confirmed members of the Scientific Committee, Dresden Nexus Conference 2015 (status 29 April 2014)

Prof. Dr. Christian Bernhofer

Technische Universität Dresden, Institute of Hydrology and Meteorology, Vice-Dean of the faculty of Environmental Sciences

Prof. Janos Bogardi

Senior fellow of the Center for Development Research of the University Bonn and senior advisor of the Global Water System Project (GWSP)

Prof. Dr. Dietrich Borchardt

Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research – UFZ, Head of the Department Aquatic Ecosystems Analysis and Management (ASAM)

Prof. em. Johan Bouma

Soils department, Wageningen University

Dr. Pay Drechsel

International Water Management Institute (IWMI),Theme Leader – Water Quality, Health and Environment, Leader – Resource Recovery & Reuse, CGIAR Research Program on Water, Land & Ecosystems

Prof. Dr. Hiroshan Hettiarachi

UNU-FLORES – United Nations University, Head of the Section Waste Management

Dr. Stephan Hülsmann

UNU-FLORES – United Nations University, Head of the Section System and Flux Analysis

Dr. Mari Ito

UNU-FLORES – United Nations University, Head of the Section Water Management

Dr. Mathew Kurian

UNU-FLORES – United Nations University, Head of the Section Capacity Development and Governance

Prof. Dr. Peter Krebs

Technische Universität Dresden, Institute for Urban Water Management, Director of the Institute

Dr. Effiom Oku

UNU-INRA – United Nations University, Research Fellow, Land and Water

Dr. habil. Kai Schwärzel

UNU-FLORES – United Nations University, Head of the Section Soil and Land-use Management

Dr. Zita Sebesvari

UNU-EHS – United Nations University, Associate Academic Officer

Dr. Danka Thalmeinrova

Global Water Partnership, GWP, Senior Knowledge Management Officer

Prof. Emilio Toastaõ

University Eduardo Mondlane, Mozambique, Dean of the Faculty of Agronomy and Forest Engineering

Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Wende

Leibnitz Institute of Ecological Urban and Regional Development (IOER)Head of Research Area Landscape Change and Management

Dr. Sarantuyaa Zandarya

UNESCO International Hydrological Programme (IHP), Programme Specialist for Urban Water Management and Water Quality

Organizing Committee

Technische Universität Dresden represented by

Dr. Katrin Fritzsche, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, International Affairs Advisor

UNU-FLORES – United Nations University represented by

Dr. Stephan Hülsmann, Head of the Section System and Flux Analysis

Dr. Mathew Kurian, Head of the Section Capacity Development and Governance

Dr. habil. Kai Schwärzel, Head of the Section Soil and Land-use Management

Leibniz Institute of Ecological Urban and Regional Development (IOER) represented by

Dr. Andreas Otto, Deputy Director / Head of Research Management

Venue

Hörsaalzentrum, Technische Universität

Bergstraße 64, 01062

Dresden, Germany

For more information about the city of Dresden please visit http://www.dresden.de/index_en.php

Contact the Organizing Committee: dnc2015@unu.edu

We look forward to welcoming you in Dresden, Germany!

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